John Fitzpatrick

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John Fitzpatrick

Biträdande lektor

Kontakt

Avdelning:
Zoologiska institutionen: Etologi
Telefon:
08-16 26 21
E-post:
john.fitzpatrick@zoologi.su.se
ORCID iD:
orcid.org/0000-0002-2834-4409
Fax:
08-15 95 22
Besöksadress:
Svante Arrheniusväg 18 B
Rum:
D 5012b
Postadress:
Stockholms universitet
Zoologiska institutionen: Etologi
106 91 Stockholm

Forskningsintressen

I am an evolutionary biologist who specializes in studying sexual selection and the evolution of reproductive behaviours and traits. Research in my lab takes an interdisciplinary approach and investigates male-male competition before and after mating, the evolution of sexual weapons, female mate choice, trade-offs and co-evolutionary dynamics.

My research is both field and lab based and combines tightly controlled experiments with phylogenetic comparative analyses. But generally I prefer to mix these approaches depending on the research question being asked.

RESEAERCH IN MY GROUP CURRENTLY FOCUSES ON:

SEXUAL SELECTION AND THE EVOLUTION OF FEMALE PROMISCUITY AND MALE SEXUAL BEHAVIOURS AND TRAITS

Females mate with multiple males in most animal species, which has important evolutionary consequences. We are using phylogenetic comparative analyses to explore how variation in female promiscuity influences the evolution of male sexual behaviours and traits. This work focuses on sharks, rays, Tanganyikan cichlids, and fishes generally, social insects, marine mammals, and mammals generally. We are currently exploring how co-evolutionary dynamics between males and females influence the evolution of testes, sperm, genitals and female remating rates.

TRADE-OFFS IN PRE- AND POST-COPULATORY SEXUAL BEHAVIOURS AND TRAITS

When it comes to sex you can’t have it all. Animals must balance their investment in behaviours and traits important before and after mating. My lab tries to understand how animals balance the competing demands of sex by exploring macro-evolutionary patterns across a wide range of taxonomic groups and experimentally using guppies and crickets.


SPERM COMPETITION AND ALTERNATIVE REPRODUCTIVE TACTICS

Not all males use the same behaviours to reproduce. In some species, larger males court and guard females to secure fertilizations, while other smaller sneaker males perform sneaky fertilizations. Research in my lab examines the reproductive consequences of these different mating behaviours, focusing on African cichlids, freshwater gobies and intertidal marine fish.


INTERESTED IN OUR RESEARCH?

We have projects available studying trade-offs in sexually selected behaviorus and traits in halfbeak fish, as well as a broad range of comparative studies focusing on sexual selection. If you are interested in joining my lab at the Masters, PhD or Post-doc level please send me an email explaining your research interests.


EDITORIAL POSITIONS

2014-Present: Editor for Behavioral Ecology
2011-2015: Board of Reviewing Editors for Journal of Evolutionary Biology


PUBLICATIONS

You can find a full list of my publications here:
Fitzpatrick GoogleScholar

Publikationer

Refereegranskat

Leigh W. Simmons, John L. Fitzpatrick. 2016. Sperm competition and the coevolution of pre- and postcopulatory traits - Weapons evolve faster than testes among onthophagine dung beetles. Evolution 70: 998-1008.

Stefan Lüpold, Joseph L Tomkins, Leigh W Simmons, John L Fitzpatrick. 2014. Female monopolization mediates the relationship between pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits. Nature Communications 5.

Luisa J Fitzpatrick, Clelia Gasparini, John L Fitzpatrick, Jonathan P Evans. 2014. Male-female relatedness and patterns of male reproductive investment in guppies. Biology Letters 10.

J L Fitzpatrick, J P Evans. 2014. Postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance in guppies. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 27.

Jennifer L Kelley, John L Fitzpatrick, Sami Merilaita. 2013. Spots and stripes - ecology and colour pattern evolution in butterflyfishes. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B, Biological Sciences 280.

J. L. Fitzpatrick, M. Almbro, A. Gonzalez-Voyer, S. Hamada, C. Pennington, J. Scanlan, Niclas Kolm. 2012. Sexual selection uncouples the evolution of brain and body size in pinnipeds. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 25: 1321-1330.

J. L. Fitzpatrick, M. Almbro, A. Gonzalez-Voyer, Niclas Kolm, L. W. Simmons. 2012. Male Contest Competition And The Coevolution Of Weaponry And Testes In Pinnipeds. Evolution 66: 3595-3604.

John L Fitzpatrick, Boris Baer. 2011. Polyandry reduces sperm length variation in social insects. Evolution 65.

John L. Fitzpatrick, Robert Montgomerie, Julie K. Desjardins, Kelly A. Stiver, Niclas Kolm, Sigal Balshine. 2009. Female promiscuity promotes the evolution of faster sperm in cichlid fishes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106: 1128-1132.

Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer, John L. Fitzpatrick, Niclas Kolm. 2008. Sexual selection determines parental care patterns in cichlid fishes. Evolution 62: 2015-2026.

J L Fitzpatrick, J K Desjardins, N Milligan, K A Stiver, R Montgomerie, S Balshine. 2008. Female-mediated causes and consequences of status change in a social fish. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B, Biological Sciences 275.