Animal ecology

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Animal ecology

Animal ecology

The ecology division has a long history of basic and applied research ranging from insects to large mammals. The research has today two main directions. One focus is on evolutionary ecology on mainly life history of insects with for example research on the ecology of butterflies. The second direction concerns the conservation ecology of mainly terrestrial vertebrates, typically exemplified in the Arctic fox project. However, there are big overlaps between these approaches with much fruitful collaboration with scientists from the other divisions and from other universities. At present there are four full professors, one lecturer, four scientists, eight post docs and nine PhD students. There are also a number of master students affiliated with the ecology division.

Arctic fox project

Inom fjällrävsprojektet arbetar vi med predator-bytesdjurs interaktioner i fjällekosystemet. Vi bedriver även forskning kring fjällrävens genetik och demografi. En stor del av forskningsresultaten används direkt i de bevarandeåtgärder som utförs för att rädda fjällräven från utrotning i Sverige. För mer information, se vår hemsida.

Insect-host plant interactions

We study the evolutionary interaction between insects (mainly butterflies) and the plants that they feed on. Our approach is integrative, combining insights from life history evolution, behavioral ecology, genomics and physiology with phylogenetic investigations of the large-scale patterns. Our primary interests are specialization and host range evolution, and how these processes may influence patterns of speciation.

Butterfly Ecology & Evolution

The research group has a very long history of research across a diverse range of species.

Predators, Climate and Ecosystems

What determines the abundance, dynamics and long-term trends of medium-sized predators such as foxes? Top-down interference from larger carnivores, or bottom-up processes associated with climate, land use and prey availability?